Get involved in fight against dog fouling

Get involved in fight against dog fouling

Communities are being urged to continue to support Scottish Borders Council’s Responsible Dog Ownership Strategy.

The strategy aims to change people’s behaviour to dog fouling and remind owners of their social and legal responsibilities.

However, a minority of owners still refuse to consider the consequences of not picking up after their pet, particularly during autumn and winter.

As part of the strategy, posters and pavement stencils can be requested by members of the public to be placed in areas where dog fouling is an issue.

Communities can also sign up to SBC’s Green Dog Walker Scheme, which aims to change attitudes towards dog fouling. Over 200 people have so far signed up to the community-led scheme since it was introduced in April 2016.

The dog fouling and littering enforcement officer also continues to patrol the Borders and can issue an £80 fine for anyone caught allowing their dog to foul or found littering, as can Police Scotland officers.

Visit www.scotborders.gov.uk/dogfouling or phone 0300 100 1800 for further information, to request posters/stencils, join the Green Dog Walker scheme or report a dog fouling issue.

Councillor Sandy Aitchison, SBC’s Executive Member for Neighbourhoods and Locality Services, said: “Dog fouling is a long standing issue which cannot be solely tackled by the Council, particularly when demand on public services is increasing while budgets are being squeezed.

“We need support from local communities. An excellent example is Dog Friendly Newtown, a group who have carried out a series of positive actions such as setting up a junior group to educate youngsters on responsible dog ownership.

“It maybe local people wish to join the Council’s Green Dog Walker Scheme, or request posters or stencils are put up in certain areas. While this may not seem like it will have the same impact as enforcement, it will aim to make owners think twice about their irresponsible actions and the affect it has on the local environment and other people within their communities.

“If the public witness dog fouling, they should continue to report it to the Council and provide as many details as possible.

“Information such as exact location, the time when the dog fouling takes place, a description of the owner and their dog, and any other relevant details are very helpful.

“Information can be provided anonymously and there would be no need to provide further evidence at a later date.”

Date of Publication: 19th September 2017